Best Electric Guitars For Kids 2020 – Reviews and Top Picks

Best Electric Guitars For Kids

Choosing a guitar is an ordeal as it is, but choosing one for your kid is even more confusing. It may seem that the majority of electric guitars for kids on the market are simply toys, and are not the ‘real deal.’ Of course, these guitars do not need to have the latest high-tech electronics, complicated Floyd Rose bridges, and powerful humbuckers. Yet, if you look carefully, you can find the axes that match the quality and the sound of the ‘big boys.’ Here are some of the best guitars for kids out there. Trust me, your kid will be delighted to get one of those.

Epiphone's Les Paul Player Pack
  • Epiphone’s Les Paul Player Pack
  • Rating:
  • Body type: Solid
  • Body shape: Les Paul
  • Body wood: Alder
  • Neck: C-shaped
  • Neck material: Hard Maple
  • Pick up: 650T / 700T Humbuckers, Open Coils
  • Fretboard wood: Rosewoood
  • Frets: 22
  • Bridge: Tune-o-Matic Bridge, Stopbar Tailpiece
  • Tuners: Precision 14:1
Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar
  • Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar
  • Rating:
  • Body type: Solid
  • Body shape: ¾ size Stratocaster
  • Body wood: Laminated Hardwood
  • Neck: C-shaped
  • Neck material: Maple
  • Pick up: Three Standard Strat Single-coil Pickups
  • Fretboard wood: Indian Laurel
  • Frets: 20
  • Bridge: 6-saddle Vintage-style Hardtail bridge, String-thru
  • Tuners: Standard Die-cast
Ibanez GRGM 6 String Solid-Body Electric Guitar
  • Ibanez Mikro GRGM 6
  • Rating:
  • Body type: Solid
  • Body shape: MiKro
  • Body wood: Poplar
  • Neck: GRG, Bolt-on
  • Neck material: Maple
  • Pick up: Humbuckers
  • Fretboard wood: Maple
  • Frets: 24
  • Bridge: Fixed
  • Tuners: Standard
Name
Body type:
Body shape:
Body wood:
Neck:
Neck material:
Price
Name
Body type:
Body shape:
Body wood:
Neck:
Neck material:
Price
№1
Solid
Les Paul
Alder
C-shaped
Hard Maple
№2
Solid
¾ size Stratocaster
Laminated Hardwood
C-shaped
Maple
№3
Solid
MiKro
Poplar
GRG, Bolt-on
Maple
№5
Solid
Double-cutaway body
Agathis
On-bolt neck
Maple
№7
Solid
Double-cutaway body
Basswood
Bold-on
Maple
№8
Solid
Single cutaway
Linden
Bold-on
Maple
Epiphone's Les Paul Player Pack

One of the best ways to introduce kids to the world of electric guitars is to get a player pack, and you can’t go wrong with the Epiphone’s Les Paul Player Pack. It includes a real Les Paul Special-II LTD, a 10-watt Electra guitar amp, clip-on tuner, strap, and picks. The guitar itself is equipped with 2 open coils humbuckers and a Tune-o-Matic bridge. Overall, a great starter pack for learning.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
Les Paul
Body wood:
Alder
Neck:
C-shaped
Neck material:
Hard Maple
Pick up:
650T / 700T Humbuckers, Open Coils
Fretboard wood:
Rosewoood
Frets:
22
Bridge:
Tune-o-Matic Bridge, Stopbar Tailpiece
Tuners:
Precision 14:1
PROS

Comes with a 10-watt Electra amplifier, gig bag and guitar accessories

Quality Les Paul’s sound

Fast neck

Affordable

Cons

Fret buzz

Poor tuning stability

Toy-like feel

Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar

If you are looking for a guitar for your kid who is already a Jimi Hendrix, Richie Blackmore or Eric Clapton fan, there is no better choice than the Squier by Fender Mini Strat. It is a ¾ sized version of an original Stratocaster with a slimmer shorter neck. It is built for kids and adults with smaller hands. The guitar features classic three Strat single-coil pickups, chrome hardware and tuners, 6-saddle vintage-style hardtail bridge and 5-way pickup selector.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
¾ size Stratocaster
Body wood:
Laminated Hardwood
Neck:
C-shaped
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
Three Standard Strat Single-coil Pickups
Fretboard wood:
Indian Laurel
Frets:
20
Bridge:
6-saddle Vintage-style Hardtail bridge, String-thru
Tuners:
Standard Die-cast
PROS

Classic Strat sound

Slim, fast neck

Playability

Incl. Amplifier + Cable, Guitar Strap, Pick, Tuner

Cons

Poor tuning stability

Occasional buzzing

Ibanez GRGM 6 String Solid-Body Electric Guitar

Ibanez Mikro GRGM 6 is a special undersized body axe, made specifically for the shorties or kids. The guitar has a smaller size and features a shorter 22-1/5” scale, but it sounds just as good as the original Ibanez axes due to the original Ibanez humbuckers.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
MiKro
Body wood:
Poplar
Neck:
GRG, Bolt-on
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
Humbuckers
Fretboard wood:
Maple
Frets:
24
Bridge:
Fixed
Tuners:
Standard
PROS

Undersized body

Medium fret size for small hands

Playability

Metal and rock tone

Cons

Poor tuning

If your kid is a fan of Pink Floyd, Bob Dylan or the Beatles, and strives to play like Syd Barrett or George Harrison – the easiest way to start is by giving them a guitar they’ve already played. Squier by Fender Affinity Series Telecaster is the best option for that as it gives you a classic Telecaster sound. The axe is sturdy and features a simple, but reliable and failproof set up: alder body with maple fretboard and neck, two vintage-style single-coil pickups, two control switch nobs, fixed six-saddle vintage bridge. As far as beginners’ guitars go, it’s one of the best electric guitars for kids.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
Telecaster
Body wood:
Alder
Neck:
Modern “C”
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
Vintage-style single-coil Telecaster pickups with three-way switching
Fretboard wood:
Maple
Frets:
21, Medium Jumbo Frets
Bridge:
Vintage Six-Saddle Fender Bridge
Tuners:
Chrome tuners
PROS

Signature Tele Sound

Solid sonic power and intonation

Tuning stability

Affordable

Cons

Pickups humming

Weak pickups

Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC012 may remind you of Stratocaster, and you won’t be wrong. The body and neck shapes are inspired by Stratocasters, yet the sonic qualities and set up are entirely different. The Agathis axe is equipped with three pickups (single-coil pickups at the neck and middle and a humbucker at the bridge), a vintage-style tremolo bridge with a whammy bar, a five-way selector switch and chrome tuners. Basically, a Strat with the rock and metal sound.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
Double-cutaway body
Body wood:
Agathis
Neck:
On-bolt neck
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
1 Humbucker + 2 single-coil pickups
Fretboard wood:
Rosewood
Frets:
22 frets
Bridge:
Vintage-style Tremolo Bridge
Tuners:
Sealed Chrome tuners
PROS

Quality sound and build

Versatility

Playability

Affordable

Cons

Weak tuners

Buzzing

This Chinese-made axe is more impressive than it may seem at first glance. The solid body is crafted from the quality alder, with a single-piece C-shaped maple neck and laurel fretboard. It is equipped with two vintage Telecaster single-coil pickups with Alnico magnets, which give the axe it’s signature warm Tele sound. As far as hardware goes, the axe features a 3-saddle hardtail bridge and vintage tuners.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
Telecaster
Body wood:
Alder
Neck:
C-shape
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
Dual Vintage-style Tele Alnico V single-coil pickups
Fretboard wood:
Laurel
Frets:
21, Medium Jumbo
Bridge:
Hardtail Tele Bridge
Tuners:
Vintage-style tuners
PROS

Warm and clear Tele tones

Playability and versatility

Sound stability

Affordable

Cons

Poor jack quality

Humming

Avengers assemble! Excuse me. But every Marvel fan will get me; Peavy Rockmaster is a dream guitar for us (and now, they are not only for kids). Back to the topic, though, this axe is made specifically for kids from 9-14. The basswood body is a ¾ size of a normal guitar, standard fretboard (21 frets) and a super simple, yet quality set up. The single humbucker is enhanced with a pull/pushing coil-split, which gives you both humbucker and single-coil sounds.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
Double-cutaway body
Body wood:
Basswood
Neck:
Bold-on
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
Humbucker
Fretboard wood:
Rosewood
Frets:
21 frets
Bridge:
Fixed bridge
Tuners:
Diecast
PROS

Catchy design

Playability and practicality

Decent sound

Durability

Cons

Starter guitar

Toy feel

Another guitar kit that has everything your kids need to kick start their guitar journey. The starter pack includes Gibson electric guitar, a small amp, guitar strap, cables, picks and even an instructional CD (who need CDs nowadays though). The guitar itself features ¾ size single-cutaway Linden body, with a single humbucker, stop-tail bridge and chrome tuners.

Body type:
Solid
Body shape:
Single cutaway
Body wood:
Linden
Neck:
Bold-on
Neck material:
Maple
Pick up:
Humbucker
Fretboard wood:
Rosewood
Frets:
22 frets
Bridge:
Stop Tail
Tuners:
Chrome tuners
PROS

Affordable

Decent sound

Features all necessary items

Practicality

Cons

Poor tuning

Fret buzz

How to choose an electric guitar for Kids – Buyer’s Guide

Starting off: Acoustic VS Electric Guitars

It is believed that complete beginners should start with acoustic guitars; I don’t believe that’s true. If your heart is set on playing the electric guitar, there is nothing stopping you. Both guitars require different skills, and you do not need to learn to play the acoustic guitar before the electric one. And there is no need to buy both! Better spend that extra cash on accessories for the electric guitar.

Guitar Scales: Standard VS Small

The only bulletproof reason you should go for a smaller scale guitar (or ¾ size) is if you are looking for an axe for your kid. Standard scale guitars will be too heavy and too large for their small hands. They simply won’t be able to hold them, let alone practice. If you are an adult and happen to have small hands, you can opt for a smaller scale as well, yet it’s not your only option. There is a variety of options with a thinner neck profile, which will help you fix the issue.

What to look for in electric guitars for kids?

Like in any other guitar, there are three important things that you need to pay attention to: tonewood, hardware and electronics. The majority of guitars made for kids are made from cheaper materials, so if you are looking for the best sound, tone stability and resonance – choose basswood.

Great hardware is hard to find on these guitars, as strings, bridge, tuning knobs and other minor parts tend to be of poor quality. The good news though, is that you can always replace it, so overall it’s not a bad issue.

Last but not least – electronics. I think those good pickups are the key to a great guitar. So be very careful when choosing this. If you look for clean, sharp and warm sounds – single-coil pickup is your choice. Humbuckers give you more versatility, color and rock tones. Single pickup configuration is easiest to operate, so it’s always better to start off with those.

You should also consider the durability of the instrument. Kids may be clumsy, so its crucial to get something that won’t break within a day.

What is the ideal budget for a kid’s electric guitar?

If you are a billionaire, you can find options of beginner guitars for over a $1,000. However, kids have a tendency to grow, so if these guitars have a smaller size – they will have a hard time playing it in a few years. So, this kind of guitar is not a long-term investment.

Instead of buying an expensive axe, look for an option under $300, like most of the options in the list above. It’s very affordable, and the sound quality is quite decent, at the very least. Besides, you won’t regret spending money on it if your kid loses interest in playing at some point.

Guitars: New VS Used

Some people would say I’m wrong, but unless you are a hardcore guitar fan or a die-hard fan of one or another band, you should always go for a new guitar. Used guitars have a great history, but they are extremely unpredictable. It’s not about who has owned them, but rather the conditions they are in. They very well can have internal damage, and if you are a complete beginner, you won’t be able to understand if the guitar is damaged or not.

New guitars are always the best electric guitars for kids. The equipment is brand new, and there is a lesser chance of malfunction. Besides, you can always return or replace it if there is something wrong with it.

What accessories should you get?

Every electric guitar needs an amp, several packs of extra strings, picks, guitar strap and cables. The amp doesn’t have to be of superior quality; a small portable one will do. If you don’t wanna bother choosing all of these things, guitars with a starter pack like Epiphone Les Paul or Maestro by Gibson would be the easiest option. The quality will not be as perfect as stand-alone pieces, but they do their job, and it’s a great deal when you’re on a strict budget.

It’s also a good idea to grab a tuner (preferably an electric one) to make tuning easier. After your skills improve, you can expand your number of accessories and get yourself some pedals and other sound effects.

Should the guitar be set up?

If you are a complete newbie – absolutely. If you are picking up the guitar for the first time in your life, and it’s completely out of tune, chances are, you’ll be so-o-o bamboozled. All new guitars come with a factory set up, which is your lifesaver. You’ll hear how a guitar should sound, and whenever it’s out of tune, just work your way back to the original tune. As soon as you master the standard guitar tuning, you can experiment with the tunings and find your sound.

Conclusion

The best kids’ electric guitars aren’t that hard to find. You don’t need to chase for the unique brands, models, pickups configuration, hardware and exquisite electronics. The guitars should have a basic set up, solid sound, be light and have smooth playability. It can be a smaller scale or simply have a thin neck profile – both will work for your kids. If you don’t want to spend much time or money on accessories, choose starter packs like the Epiphone Les Paul Starter pack.

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By Max Hudson
    about author

    My name is Max Hudson, born and raised in Chicago. I'm 30 years old and like many other people, I discovered guitar in my teens and have never looked back since. It has quickly evolved into a passion and has given me a creative outlet, something to redirect my time and unlimited energy toward. I want this website to be a handbook for players of all skill levels. It can become a starting point for your new hobby, where you can find the right instrument, get tips for playing effortlessly or anything else music related.

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